Last Call...

Well, I did it.

As I have shared, I was under-trained, a bit over weight, and unprepared for the race, but I knew I needed to do it. I’m still not fully recovered from the Achilles tear that kept me out of last year’s race. But all of that is now in the past.

At the Marathon Chapel at the start before the race, in one of the messages I delivered, I reminded the runners to trust God in their darkest moments on the course. I know I did.

I was toast by Mile 10. I had nothing left in the tank. But I pushed ever forward. Step-by-step all the way over the 26.2 miles to the glorious finish in Central Park.

There is nothing remotely like the New York City Marathon. As I have written in other places, that race has become part of who I am - part of my very being. (It’s hard to explain.) This was my seventh NYC Marathon, each has been a wonderful journey - each has been different, but, even through the pain, the doubt, and the physical suffering, each has been glorious and wonderful.

My time, (unofficially) 4:47:47, was my slowest marathon ever, but that was to be expected. I gave it all I had, left it all on the course, and battled through…

It was a great day because of the organization, the support from NYRR, Emergency Services, the many volunteers, the Police and Fire Departments, and so many more. It was a great day because of the love that the New York spectators give to the runners. Hearing, “Go Dr. Sem” and “You’re Awesome!” for 26.2 miles creates a special feeling that is also impossible to fully explain.

There is nothing like this race!

As you all also know, I ran this race to support the American Cancer Society - a wonderful organization that has helped my family as my in-laws battle this disease. The support they have given and provided, for free, has been tremendous and greater than we could have ever imagined. I wanted to use the race to give back to them.

As we go back, totally to baseball tomorrow, I’ll ask our readers, one last time to consider donating to this wonderful cause. If you’d like to give, please click here:

Dr. Sem Runs the NYC Marathon for the American Cancer Society.

THANK YOU!!!

 That’s Me At The Start!

That’s Me At The Start!





A Plan for the 5th Rotation Spot

A Plan for the 5th Rotation Spot

2018 may be remembered as the first year that numerous teams experimented with the idea of using an “opener”, or a pitcher that matched up specifically with the first 3-5 hitters in the opposing team’s lineup prior to giving way to the rest of the bullpen. Teams utilized openers to varying degrees of success this year, prompting many in the baseball community to rethink the composition of the traditional pitching staff. In 2018, the Yankees did not employ an opener in any of their rotation spots. Despite this fact, the Yankees kept a minimum of 12-13 pitchers on the staff for most games this season. Most of that time, the 12th and 13th members of the pitching staff would go multiple days without being used, essentially wasting a roster spot as insurance for a blowout game. While the idea of an opener can be debated as a legitimate solution for off-season roster construction as opposed to a desperate decision for a flawed team, one idea that was not really explored last season was the idea of employing multiple multi-inning relievers to fill out a rotation spot. Most teams struggle to find even 3 or 4 legitimate starters to pitch 180-200 innings each year, which leaves 1-2 rotation spots to pitchers who probably cannot achieve acceptable statistics for a competitive team over the course of 150+ innings. Based on the available options on the Free Agent market, and the abundance of intriguing pitchers the Yankees have in the high minors, I think the Yankees would be well served to explore using tandem starters in the 5th rotation slot.

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Tweet of the Day: Got To Love The Fan's Passion!

Brett Gardner and Two Paths Forward

Brett Gardner and Two Paths Forward

As has been widely reported, Brett Gardner is back in the fold for another year with the Yankees on a 1 year, $7.5 million deal. Here is what we know right now:

  1. By exercising Gardner’s $2 million buyout and resigning him to a $7.5 million contract, the Yankees saved $3 million against the luxury tax threshold vs. simply exercising Gardner’s final year $12.5 million club option.

  2. The Yankees now have 6 major league options for the outfield: Aaron Hicks, Aaron Judge, Giancarlo Stanton, Brett Gardner, Clint Frazier, and Jacoby Ellsbury.

  3. River Ave Blues projected that the Yankees had roughly $49.7 million to spend before hitting the luxury tax threshold this winter prior to the Gardner signing. Signing Gardner gives the roughly $42.2 million to spend this winter in the Free Agent market.

Based on those facts, the Yankees can follow one of two paths: keep the current lineup relatively unchanged from last season (except for finding a Didi fill-in) and once again stay under the luxury tax threshold; or use the money saved in future tax savings by staying under the luxury tax threshold this year to make multiple splashes in the free agent market. Here’s what each path might look like this off-season:

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Breaking News: Yankees and Gardner Agree to One-Year Deal

Breaking News: Yankees and Gardner Agree to One-Year Deal

The Yankees Official Twitter announced earlier today that they have agreed with OF Brett Gardner on a One-Year deal for the 2019 season.

The wording of the tweet makes it seem as though the Yankees have declined Gardner’s $12.5M option for the 2019 season, and according to Mark Feinsand, the deal is expected to be worth $7.5M

This solidifies the expected Yankees 2019 Outfield to continue- as currently projected, there is plenty of offseason to go- as it was for the past two years from Left to Right with: Brett Gardner, Aaron Hicks, and Aaron Judge.

Here, I will give my quick analysis of the expected $7.5M/1-Year Deal:

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The Other First Base Solution from San Francisco

The Other First Base Solution from San Francisco

In many respects, Buster Posey’s value to the Giants is limited, but for the right team he could still play a valuable role. The right team would have to have enough power so that Posey, who can still get on base with a good frequency, but is no longer a major home run threat, would not be expected to be the big bopper. It would also have to be a contending team who would benefit from using Posey as an occasional catcher because of his great skill at handling pitchers, particularly young ones. If that team happened to have playing time available at first base and DH, but had a young catcher who was expected to be the starter but who might benefit from Posey’s experience and guidance that would be even better. 

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