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3 Reasons Why Corey Seager Should Not Be the Shortstop Target for 2022:

Reporter Bob Klapish made a very big statement to insiders yesterday to try and explain the Yankees lack of spending during the 2020/21 offseason: to go after shortstop Corey Seager this offseason. Let’s talk about 3 reasons why this possible move makes no sense (at the current time).

 

Tweets:

“Corey Seager will be a #Yankees’ target this off-season. Which is why Hal didn’t want to fire all his bullets last off-season.” – Klapisch. — Darius Glover (@GloverDarius) March 21, 2021

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Reason 1: The Health of Corey Seager (vs. Other Potentially Available Shortstops)

As I pointed to in my recent post looking at available free agent catchers, one key thing that I would hold extremely valuable and important when looking to sign a free agent would be health. This is a shared viewpoint between my father (Paul Semendinger) and I, from which Corey Seager does have some concern on that front.

Early during the 2018 season, Corey Seager went down with a UCL strain on his right (throwing) arm and a trip to the 10-Day DL. Fourteen days later however, Seager was moved to the 60-Day DL and was set to get Tommy John Surgery. He would also receive surgery on his left hip during his recovery in August 2018.

In 2019, Corey Seager would end up temporarily on the IL again with a left hamstring strain in mid-June, ultimately returning in mid-July. Luckily, he hasn’t had any injuries or IL time since after a healthy 2020 season.

However, it is important to look at this in comparison to the other (potentially) available shortstops for 2021/2022. Here are each of those players recent DL/IL trips since 2018:

Francisco Lindor: One 10-Day IL stint in 2019 (Left ankle sprain & Right calf strain)

Carlos Correa: One 10-Day IL stint in 2018 (Lower back soreness), One 10-Day IL stint in 2019 (Back discomfort), and One 60-Day IL stint in 2019 (Fracture rib)

Trevor Story: One 10-Day IL stint in 2019 (Right thumb sprain)

Jaiver Baez: No DL/IL activity since 2016

From this, it is clear there are healthier shortstop options if the Yankees plan to pursue one of these top talent shortstops next offseason.

 

Reason 2: The Los Angeles Dodgers and Spending Money

The Los Angeles Dodgers are not afraid to spend money to get or keep around good players. It goes without saying, but just look at a few of the moves they have made during the past few offseasons:

2018/19: Extended Clayton Kershaw (LHP) on a 3-Year/$93 Million deal

2019/20: Traded for and then Extended Mookie Betts (OF) on a 12-Year/$365 Million deal

2020/21: Signed Trevor Bauer (RHP) to a 3-Year/$102 Million deal

The Los Angeles Dodgers are willing to spend what it takes to win. And, they’ve been rewarded for doing so by making the World Series in three of the last four seasons (2017, 2018, 2020) and being the current World Series champions from 2020.

If they’re interesting in bringing back their fan favorite shortstop they will do so. I’d also argue that if the Dodgers don’t try and bring back Seager there is likely a good reason that they know not to extend him to a long-term deal.

 

Reason 3: The Yankees Already Filled Infield (Voit/DJ/Gleyber/Urshela)

Finally, we get to this final point (and my logic for as to why I was not originally interested in the Yankees giving DJ LeMahieu a new contract before learning the terms of the deal are incredibly team-friendly): the Yankees now have a full infield. Technically, they don’t need to spend big on a shortstop.

With Gleyber Torres looking to be the next big thing (2020 aside), the Yankees are not a team that should be desperately looking to get a shortstop. If they were to sign a new shortstop, it would mean Gleyber Torres would shift to second base. At that point, DJ LeMahieu would be without a spot and would need to become the team’s full-time third baseman (thus, Gio Urshela is without a spot), first baseman (thus, Luke Voit is without a spot), or they’d transition him into the infield utility role (which at an AAV of $15 Million is a lot to pay for that type of player).

From this, the other options would be to have traded one of Gleyber Torres, Gio Urshela, or Luke Voit in order to make room. There are plenty of reasons as to why the Yankees (who have been extremely money conscious) would not be wanting to trade away good, cheap, and controllable players.

I firmly agree that the Yankee should always pursue the best talent available, I also agree that you can never have too much good talent. A teams first focus should be getting good players, figuring out where they play can come later. However, the Yankees of late don’t inspire me to think that Corey Seager is that next option, regardless of what Bob Klapish would otherwise say.

 

Article By: Ethan Semendinger

Date Published: March 23rd, 2021

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