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Card-by-Yankees Card: The 1977 Topps Set, Card #255, George Scott (Article 50)

by Paul Semendinger

(Continuing a series…)



George “Boomer” Scott was a three time All-Star. A power-hitting first baseman, George Scott was also an outstanding defensive player. In his career, he won eight Gold Gloves.

In his career, Boomer blasted 271 homers while playing primarily for the Boston Red Sox (1966-71), Milwaukee Brewers (1972-76), and the Red Sox again (1977-79).

In June 1979, the Red Sox traded Scott to the Kansas City Royals. He appeared in 44 games for the Royals going .267/1/20, but on August 17, the Royals released him.

Nine days later, on August 29, 1979, George Scott signed with the Yankees.

In his entire career, George Scott batted .300 or better only twice. In 1967, for the Red Sox in their Impossible Dream season, he hit .303. For the Brewers in 1976, he hit .306.

As a Yankee, George Scott batted .318.

But, truth be told, that was in 16 games, in just 47 at bats.

George Scott hit 154 home runs as a Red Sox.

He blasted 115 round-trippers as a Brewer.

For the Yankees, he hit just one homer.

Just one.

It was the last home run of his career.

***

The date was August 29, 1979. George Scott was playing in his second game in pinstripes. Well, not really… the Yankees were playing in Texas. He was playing his second game in the Yankees’ road greys.

It was the top of the second inning…

Chris Chambliss had reached on an error.

Roy White then had a bunt single.

With that, George Scott came up and blasted a three-run homer which tied the game at 3-3. Later that inning, the Yankees would get two more runs and eventually win the game 7-5.

***

One finds interesting statistics when he looks carefully through the numbers.

As noted, George Scott played in 16 games as a Yankee.

In the games where he went hitless, the Yankees went 0-7. If George Scott didn’t get a hit, the Yankees didn’t win.

***

George Scott’s career ended after that 1979 season.

I wonder if he knew it at the time, but he singled in his last ever big league at bat.

In the bottom of the 9th inning in a game against the Indians at Yankee Stadium. Scott’s single began a four-run inning that saw the Yankees go from being down 2-1 to winning 5-2 on a walk-off three-run homer by Oscar Gamble.

It wasn’t a bad way, I am sure, to close out an excellent career.


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